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What to look for in mobile computer mounting equipment


Editor's note: Jeff Greene, President of Gamber-Johnson, was recently featured in the following article from Next Generation Power & Energy Magazine where he spoke about the criteria of choosing mobile computer mounting equipment for your fleet.

Next Generation Power & Energy Magazine







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JG. Modular design is important because it gives you upgrade flexibility going forth. Interchangeability is very convenient — making it easy for technicians to learn and install the equipment. Equipment must be rugged and durable as well. It should be designed with user-safety and ergonomics in mind. For docking stations it is critical to select products that are certified and endorsed by the computer manufacturer, or you may risk serious compatibility issues between the docking station and mobile computer.

PE. How is it possible to keep up with advancing technologies once a fleet has been fitted with mobile computing and mounting systems?

JG. I believe one of the best ways to stay current on advancing technologies is to broaden your network and make good use of user conferences and symposiums typically hosted by the mobile computing manufacturers. They often invite their partners (e.g. software developers, carriers and vehicle mounting companies) to participate and give presentations on the latest challenges and developments. These events also allow one to network with other users and to see best practice.

PE. You mentioned the importance of a lifecycle mobile solution. Could you elaborate on this?

JG. The best mobile strategies are those that focus on a total vehicle solution and that involve periodic, scheduled reassessments of the mobile solution with the cooperation of the integrator and provider. You need to integrate the way you do business with the way you manage your technology. Therefore, look at the vehicle as a whole — as a mobile office and an extension of your company.

By establishing policies that determine how technology is to be used, how to evaluate the usefulness of the components, and when to reevaluate the current system, you can put a life cycle solution in place. Select and benchmark indicators such as cost savings, improvement in response times, end-user satisfaction, customer satisfaction, and increases in production. These indicators will point out what is working and what isn’t to help you focus your attention in achieving maximum ROI.

If you set up a lifecycle solution with your integrator from the initial deployment, you’re one competitive step ahead. If you select rugged, durable, modular mounts and docking stations to house your components, then you’re another step ahead — with a system that’s easy and cost-effective to upgrade as your company strives to meet new customer demands with the latest mobile technologies.

Jeff Greene, Gamber-Johnson LLC President, has a BS in Industrial Technology Production from Eastern Washington State University and graduated from the Minnesota Executive Program from the University of Minnesota Carson School of Business Management. Greene formerly worked in operations management for Square D Corporation, GEC\ALSTHOM and Larsen Electronics.

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