Firefighting Standards


Welcome to the Firefighting Standards section on FireRescue1. Look to this section for information on the various standards that affect firefighting, including key NFPA standards. Use the menu below to search and find specific standards, and follow the Buy Now links to purchase the complete standard documents.

Firefighting Standards

  • NFPA

    NFPA

    NFPA is a standards writing organization, founded in 1896 and dedicated to the concept of voluntary consensus standards writing. While it is not an enforcing agency, NFPA enjoys a unique reputation; and its standards have been adopted by all levels of government, in many cases giving the standards the force of law. Each NFPA standard undergoes revision every 5 years to ensure that it is kept current with new fire protection knowledge and technologies. The NFPA process is open and anyone can participate.

  • OSHA

    OSHA

    OSHA's mission is to assure the safety and health of America's workers by setting and enforcing standards.

    Several states have their own OSHA standards; however, NFPA standards are generally more rigorous than OSHA standards. Since the FED-OSHA standard has not been revised for over twenty years, clothing that is labeled to NFPA standards will easily exceed FED-OSHA standards. However, clothing meeting OSHA will not necessarily meet NFPA, and so it is important for the end users to be aware of existing state OSHA requirements and how they compare to NFPA requirements.

  • ANSI

    ANSI

    As the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) empowers its members and constituents to strengthen the U.S. marketplace position in the global economy while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

  • EPA

    EPA

    EPA regulates the emissions from mobile sources by setting standards for the specific pollutants being emitted. EPA established progressively more stringent emission standards for carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter, starting in the mid-1970s for on-road vehicles and in the early 1990s for nonroad engines and equipment. Emissions standards set limits on the amount of pollution a vehicle or engine can emit. Once EPA sets emission standards for a particular engine and/or vehicle category, manufacturers must produce engines that meet those standards within the timeframe of the corresponding implementation schedule.

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