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Orlando Shooting

Early June 12, 2016, 29-year-old Omar Mateen opened fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, killing 49 people and wounding 53, police said. Mateen also was killed.

The chaos of June 12, 2016, left lingering trauma for first responders and led local agencies to reexamine their preparation for active-shooter events
The memorial will be at the site of the former nightclub and the museum will be a third of a mile away
The program is intended to teach first responders how to care for themselves after crisis events and recognize peers who may have PTSD
The service was closed to the public and was held for survivors, victims’ families, club employees and local officials
The two medics out of Station 5, 300 feet from the nightclub, treated and transported about one-third of the victims that morning
Dispatchers were fed erroneous information and all of the emergency exits worked according to a May fire inspection
OCFR Wellness Coordinator Lt. Anthony Willis: “It’s very important we keep an eye on our firefighters as we move forward. We can’t afford for anyone to commit suicide.”
The fire dept. sent more than 80 personnel and 34 vehicles, but they were forced to remain outside
Lt. Davis Odell Jr. was stationed two doors from the Pulse nightclub and began treating victims as shots rang out
Over 100 of the nearly 200 employees came into work during and after the shooting
Cory Connell wanted to be a firefighter even after he was warned that the profession wasn’t exactly the most lucrative
Orlando firefighters treated and sheltered victims at a station fewer than 200 yards from the nightclub
Fire and EMS leaders and providers need to study successes and failures as an opportunity to reduce death and disability from the next mass shooting
Around 750 firefighters congregated at an annual union meeting, where many donated blood
An off-duty paramedic used a radio traffic app to update a comment on the Pulse Facebook page throughout the incident